Preventive Eye Care

Our eyes are working from the moment we open them in the morning to the second our heads hit our pillows at night. With our daily eye strain, it will be unavoidable to suffer some damage to our eyes throughout our lives. However, like any other part of our body, there are steps we can take to slow down or halt our potential damage.

Here are three easy ways everyone can ease up on their eye’s daily damage:

Sunglasses

A multi-faceted fashion accessory, sunglasses can complete your outfit while protecting your eyes from UV damage. About 20 percent of cataracts are caused by UV rays. Keep your eyes safe with sunglasses that cover the entirety of your eye.

Tip: Don’t neglect how your favorite shades fit your face. Ill-fitting sunglasses may not have the same effects and can contribute to headaches.

Healthy Diet and Exercise

The core of everyone’s health will come back to diet and exercise. A healthy plate full of nutrient rich food like zinc, vitamins A, C, and E, and omega-3 fatty acids will help ward off age-related vision diseases by keeping your eyes strong. Drink plenty of water every day.

Body weight is directly linked to the pressure placed on your eyes. Intense pressure inside the eyes is referred to as intraocular pressure. This pressure can heighten your risk for glaucoma.

And, if you haven’t yet, quit smoking now. Even better is to never start smoking.

Regular Eye Exams

Exam eyes at all life stages are vital to keeping vision strong. Just like our yearly or twice-yearly visits to the doctor and dentist, it is just as important to have our eyes examined.

Many eye diseases do not have early symptoms, so they can go unnoticed for years.  While eye exams may bring up personal anxieties, they are critical for overall health. Early treatment for eye diseases such as cataracts, glaucoma, or age-related macular degeneration, will help prevent vision loss.

These are just a few ways you can keep your eyes healthy. Make an appointment today and talk to one of our highly-skilled doctors who can tell you more about overall eye health and help address any concerns you may have.